3 Tips For Reaching Out to A Therapist

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So you’ve made the decision to start therapy. Congrats! The only thing is you need to find a therapist and hopefully they have openings and availability to accommodate you. I’ve been there, too. In a search for my own therapist a couple of years ago, I was in the same position. I was able to find one by asking friends and searching online catalogs like Psychology Today and Therapy for Black Girls. You can also contact your insurance company for referrals which makes it guaranteed the therapist you choose will take your insurance.

You may have already browsed a few profiles who have resonated with you and you are thinking about making a phone call or writing an email to ask about openings. As a therapist, I want to thank you for taking those first steps and reaching out to start the process. There are few tips I want to share with you with how to expedite this process.

Leave a way to get in contact with you

If you call a therapist and there is no answer, leave a voicemail with a return phone number or email and the best time to get in touch with you. As a means of maintaining your privacy, it is also beneficial if you leave in the message with a statement on if it is okay to leave a voicemail or email you back. Many therapists have emails and/or may accept text communication (once you’re an established client and have given the appropriate approval) so if this is a preferred method of communication for you, do not hesitate to email.

Share what you hope to get out of therapy

The decision to begin therapy may not be an easy one, especially with the knowledge that you will be sharing personal information with a complete stranger. If the therapist offers a consultation, I would suggest using that time to convey your reason for seeking therapy and what you hope to get out of the process. This is also the time to ask any questions of your therapist and interview them to see if you would be a good fit. Which leads me to my next tip.

Therapists are not one size fits all

Each therapist is an individual who has specific training and their own unique therapy style. There are no two therapists who are alike and there is no therapist who will align perfectly with your expectations. Therapists are human as well. The relationship between therapist and patient/client is one that requires communication and relies on commitment to the process to be beneficial. With this in mind, I will advise you to give it a few sessions to build a rapport with the therapist and communicate any concerns you may have. If you believe a particular therapist may not be the best fit for you, let them know. By communicating your experience to the therapist, they will, in turn, be able to gain insight about what may or may not have been helpful and can pivot accordingly.

I hope you found these tips to be helpful and I wish you the best on your healing journey. If you have any other questions about finding a therapist (or any other topic), send me an email at Krystal@simplybeingcounseling.com. You can also find me on Instagram and Facebook.